Man Ray, Self-Portrait, 1966

Man Ray, Self-Portrait, 1966


 Lady Love
She is standing on my lids
And her hair is in my hair
She has the colour of my eye
She has the body of my hand
In my shade she is engulfed
As a stone against the sky
She will never close her eyes
And she does not let me sleep
And her dreams in the bright day
Make the suns evaporate
And me laugh cry and laugh
Speak when I have nothing to say
Paul Eluard (translated by Samuel Beckett)
Photo: Man Ray, 1939

Lady Love

She is standing on my lids

And her hair is in my hair

She has the colour of my eye

She has the body of my hand

In my shade she is engulfed

As a stone against the sky

She will never close her eyes

And she does not let me sleep

And her dreams in the bright day

Make the suns evaporate

And me laugh cry and laugh

Speak when I have nothing to say

Paul Eluard (translated by Samuel Beckett)

Photo: Man Ray, 1939

Man Ray

Marcel Duchamp distorted (1925)


Man Ray, Quatre ou cinq fois, 1929

Man Ray, Quatre ou cinq fois, 1929

eightofive:

Paul Colin: Femmes, 1953

eightofive:

Paul Colin: Femmes, 1953

F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Beautiful and Damned (via introspectivepoet)
It seemed that the only lover she had ever wanted was a lover in a dream.
pyrrhics:

Tilda Swinton as David Bowie

pyrrhics:

Tilda Swinton as David Bowie

categorized-art-collection:

Sophie Calle, “Les Dormeurs (The Sleepers)” (1979): The artist asked friends to sleep in her bed in eight hour shifts. She documented their stay and noted “important” aspects of their visit, as well as what they ate that day.

"I asked people to give me a few hours of their sleep. To come and sleep in my bed. To let themselves be looked at and photographed. To answer questions. To each participant I suggested an eight-hour stay. I contacted 45 people by phone: people I didn’t know and whose names were suggested to me by common acquaintances, a few friends, and neighborhood residents whose work called them on to sleep during the day (the baker, for instance.) I intended my bedroom to become a constantly occupied space for eight days, with sleepers succeeding one another at regular intervals. Twenty-nine people finally accepted. Of these, five never showed up: an agency baby-sitter and I took their places. Sixteen people refused either because they had other commitments or the thing didn’t agree with them. The occupation of the bed began on Sunday, April 1, at 5 p.m. and ended on Monday, April 9, at 10 a.m. Twenty-eight sleepers succeeded one another. A few of them overlapped with each other. Breakfast, lunch, or dinner was served to each depending on the time of the day. Clean bedsheets were placed at the disposition of each sleeper. I put questions to those who allowed me—nothing to do with knowledge or fact-gathering, but rather to establish a neutral and distant contact. I took photographs every hour. I watched my guest sleep." (Sophie Calle, No. 1: First Works by 362 Artists, pp. 70-1)